Bystander Action to Prevent Violence Against Women

One in three Victorians have witnessed sexism and discrimination against women during the past year, but less than half said or did something to stop it, a new VicHealth research report shows. A further one in 10 also said they wanted to intervene, but didn’t say or do anything to show they disagree with sexist attitudes. The More than ready report involved a survey by the Social Research Centre of 600 Victorians about their willingness to speak up against certain situations of sexism, harassment and discrimination of women. It looked at whether people…Read more
National Plan to Reduce Violence against Women and their Children

National Plan to Reduce Violence against Women and their Children

One in three Australian women have experienced physical violence since the age of 15, and almost one in five have experienced sexual violence, according to the ABS. In 2005, over 350,000 women experienced physical violence and over 125,000 women experienced sexual violence. Indigenous women and girls are 35 times more likely to be hospitalised due to family violence related assaults
National violence plan a landmark moment

National violence plan a landmark moment

The National Plan to Reduce Violence against Women and Their Children 2010-2022 has been released. “This is a landmark development and one which will significantly assist the more than 300,000 women that experience violence in Australia every year, and their children, to live lives that are free from abuse and fear”, said Commissioner Broderick.

How we separate ‘us’ from the victims of violence

We separate us from them, in different ways. Whether we render it an ethnic thing, a cultural thing, a gang thing, a mob thing, a poverty thing, a feral thing, an inhuman thing the constant is that there is always a victim of violence and there were always people who knew.

Australia and the United States partnership to address violence against women globally

Violence devastates the lives of millions of women and girls globally. It knows no socio-economic or educational boundaries. It is not particular to any society or culture. Globally, around 30 per cent of women and girls experience physical, psychological or sexual violence during their lifetime. Tragically, the incidence of violence is much higher in situations of armed conflict. This is simply unacceptable. Violence against women is a universal problem that must be universally condemned and addressed.